Join Us

Sunday


SUNDAY May 22nd, 2011

Theme: National Ocean Policy

Location: Marvin Center, George Washington University, 800 21st Street, N.W., Washington D.C. 20052

Schedule

8:00-8:30  Registration

8:30-9:00  Welcoming Event

9:00-10:30  Plenary: National Ocean Policy

10:45-12:15  Plenary: “Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning – What’s in it for me?”

12:15-1:15  Lunch

12:30-1:15  The Changing Media and the Everlasting Sea

1:15-2:30  Workshops and Panels
Panel: Ocean Recreation and Conservation Alliances
Panel: Endangered Water Systems–Infrastructure and Innovation
Panel: Aritsts & the Ocean
Workshop: Finding the Funding for Your Ocean Conservation Project

2:45-4:00  Workshops and Panels
Panel: Oceans and the Federal Budget-Sink or Swim?
Workshop: Implementing Good Ocean Policy at the State Level
Panel: Cities and The Sea
Panel:  The Future of Fish

4:15-5:30  Plenary: Capitol Hill Ocean Day Training

5:45-7:00  Plenary: Overcoming “Ocean Deficit Disorder”: Reconnecting Our Youth to the Oceans and Nature

from 7:00  SURFING OUR WAY TO THE HILL PARTY
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Event Descriptions

8:00-8:30 Registration (3rd Floor)
Light breakfast and coffee provided for anyone who arrived on Sunday.

8:30 – 9:00 Welcoming Event (Grand Ballroom)
Policy Jam! Open mic for ocean issues. Guests were welcome to let the room know what they’re working on and what we can do to help.

9:00-10:30 Plenary: National Ocean Policy (Grand Ballroom)
For the first time in history the United States has a national ocean policy. It is based on an Executive Order signed by President Barack Obama in July 2010. This followed on the recommendations of two major blue ribbon ocean panels in 2003 and 2004 and extensive public hearings in 2009. It is supposed to use “ecosystem-based coastal and marine spatial planning,” to coordinate agencies and ocean uses in ways that reduce user conflicts while assuring the sustainable health and ecological recovery of our public seas. This session included key leaders who explained the ongoing process to make this happen and the role that citizens, local and regional stakeholders can and must play.
PANELISTS: Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (U.S. Senate), John Weber (New England Regional Ocean Council), Dana Goward (U.S. Coast Guard), Larry Robinson (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)
MODERATOR: Jeff Burnside (NBC Miami)
Organizers: David Helvarg (Blue Frontier Campaign), Sarah Chasis (NRDC) & Dave Wilmot (Ocean Champions)

Watch the Plenary (Part 1 and Part 2)

Notes
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10:45 -12:15 Plenary: “Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning – What’s in it for me?” (Grand Ballroom)
How do ocean users, businesses and the American public actually benefit from coastal and marine spatial planning? As an important priority objective of the National Ocean Policy, coastal and marine spatial plans are intended to be developed in nine regions of the country and over a dozen states already active to various degrees in marine spatial planning for their own state waters. Yet many ocean users, industries and elected officials still express concern or confusion about the need, process and value of CMSP. This panel of experienced CMSP participants sought to demystify coastal and marine spatial planning and illustrate the many benefits of CMSP with concrete examples from their personal experience.
PANELISTS: Steve Murawski, PhD. (University of South Florida), Priscilla Brooks, PhD. (Conservation Law Foundation), Jennifer McCann (University of Rhode Island’s Coastal Resource Center), David Sanford III (American Association of Port Authorities), Sandra Whitehouse, PhD. (Ocean Conservancy)
MODERATOR: Sean Cosgrove (Conservation Law Foundation)
Organizers: Sean Cosgrove (Conservation Law Foundation) & Dr. Anna Zivian (Ocean Conservancy)

Watch the Plenary (Part 1 and Part 2)

Notes
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12:15 – 1:15 Lunch (Continental Ballroom)
Vegetarian food provided
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12:30 – 1:15 The Changing Media and the Everlasting Sea (Grand Ballroom)
Journalism and media are going through rapid changes that also impact how we get our information about changes in our public seas. This luncheon panel mixed traditional journalists with people working on online media education and advocacy to examine different ways we can tell stories about the other 71 percent of our blue planet and its impact on all of us.
PANELISTS: Jeff Burnside (NBC Miami), Louie Psihoyos (Director -The Cove), Charlotte Vick (Curator of GOOGLE Ocean for Sylvia Earle Foundation), Tim Wheeler (Baltimore Sun), Dave Toole (Outhink Media)
Moderator & Organizer: David Helvarg (Blue Frontier Campaign)

Watch the Panel (Part 1 and Part 2)

Notes
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1:15-2:30 WORKSHOPS AND PANELS

Panel: Ocean Recreation and Conservation Alliances (Grand Ballroom)
Millions of Americans participate in non-consumptive ocean recreational activities each year, generating billions of dollars for coastal communities and the nation as a whole. However, the interests of ocean recreationalists have not always been fully reflected in management decisions. This panel explored the enhanced role that ocean recreationalists can play in advancing ocean and coastal conservation, both as individuals and as a sector.
PANELISTS: Dan Pingaro (Sailors for the Sea), Tom Raftican (Sportfishing Conservancy), Margo Pellegrino (Activist and paddler), Kyle Thiermann (Surf Ambassador, Save the Waves)
Moderator: Linwood Pendleton (NOAA)
Organizers: Pete Stauffer (Surfrider) & Amanda Mayhew (IFAW)

Watch the Panel (Part 1 and Part 2)

Notes
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Panel: Endangered Water Systems–Infrastructure and Innovation (Room 307)
Aging water infrastructure and over-used, over-capacity systems are causing wide-spread water issues and non-point-source pollution problems – especially from wastewater treatment facilities that cannot treat the water they’re sent, stormwater basins in towns and counties that take years to clean, repair, and replace, and drinking water systems that are almost as porous as the soil they run through. What can ocean advocates do to stem the tide of unbridled seepage of sewage into the coastal zone?
PANELISTS: Alexandra Dunn (Association of State & Interstate Water Pollution Control Administrators), John Cronin (Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries), Charles “Casey” Dinges (American Society of Civil Engineers)
MODERATOR: Sean Dixon (Clean Ocean Action)
Organizers: Cindy Zipf & Sean Dixon (Clean Ocean Action)

Notes Unavailable
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Panel: Blue Artists Panel (room 308)
This panel discussion focused on the works of individual artists whose work is inspired by the sea.  The strengths and limitations of art as a form of communication and as a way to change public perceptions of ocean conservation issues was discussed.
PANELISTS: Dianna Cohen (Artist, Plastic Pollution Coalition), Louie Psihoyos (Director, The Cove), Brian Skerry (Photojournalist), Kristin McArdle (Kristin McArdle Dance)
Moderator & Organizer: Jim Toomey (Cartoonist, Sherman’s Lagoon)

Watch the Panel (Part 1 and Part 2)

Notes
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Workshop: Finding the Funding for Your Ocean Conservation Project (Room 310)
Veteran fundraiser Chris Palmer provided an intensive and enjoyable workshop focused on learning the skills and techniques needed to raise money. Participants learned how to build relationships with wealthy donors and make an ask of them.
MODERATOR & Organizer: Chris Palmer (American University)

Watch the Workshop (Part 1 Part 2 and Part 3)

Notes
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2:45-4:00 WORKSHOPS AND PANELS

Panel: Oceans and the Federal Budget:  Sink or Swim? (Grand Ballroom)
In the turbulent political seascape of a slow economic recovery, rising deficits, and increasing pressure for budget cuts, will ocean funding stay afloat or sink?  The budget battle for fiscal year 2012 is underway and there is no time to lose for all of us who want to see significant support for ocean science, management and conservation.  This panel discussed the status of the ongoing budget negotiations, offered insights into the process, potential outcomes for key ocean programs, and shared thoughts on how to effectively engage in the dynamic appropriations process.
PANELISTS: Paul Carver (Virginia Tech), Emily Woglom (Ocean Conservancy), Jeremy Weirich (U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, and Science)
MODERATOR & ORGANIZER: Dave Wilmot (Ocean Champions)

Watch the Panel (Part 1 and Part 2)

Notes
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Workshop: Implementing Good Ocean Policy at the State Level (Room 307)
This workshop focused on strategies for getting things done (to save the coasts and oceans) at the local level. Speakers discussed what it takes to be self-sufficient and independent of national politics, policies, and problems and truly run an in-state campaign.  This panel provided views from local-focused environmental advocates, state politicians, and state administrators on how these diverse stakeholder groups interact in the development of good ocean policy and to arrive at decisions that have actual, on-the-ground benefits for coastal ecosystems.
PANELISTS: Jeff Benoit (Restore America’s Estuaries)
MODERATOR: Kristen Fletcher (Coastal States Organization)
Organizers: Cindy Zipf & Sean Dixon (Clean Ocean Action)

Notes
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Panel: Cities and The Sea (Room 308)
Much of the U.S. coastline is characterized by large urban centers, ‘suburbanized’ coastal counties, and densely developed coastal margins. With a population of 311 million, the U.S. must absorb an additional 1- 2 million people per year in coastal watersheds yet maintain a sustainable and built environment. There are also many emerging challenges including rising energy demand, sea level rise and coastal storms, and increased ocean user conflicts that present unique challenges for “Cities by the Sea.” Panelists discussed innovative approaches they are taking, and strategic approaches, and practical frameworks for addressing coastal and ocean challenges facing urban and suburban areas.
PANELISTS: Dr. Jerry Schubel (Aquarium of the Pacific), Donna Weiting (NOAA), Dr. Peter Ortner (University of Miami), Jack Wiggin (Urban Harbors Institute), Robbin Peach (UMASS Boston)
MODERATOR: Roland Lewis (Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance)
ORGANIZER: Tony MacDonald (Urban Coast Institute)

Notes Unavailable
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Panel: The Future of Fish (Room 310)
How do we feed the world and protect the future of fish? Seafood is a key protein source for many people, particularly in the developing world. In the face of rising populations and declining wild resources, what is the future of fish? Aquaculture is being touted by some as the only viable way to increase seafood supply without placing further stress on marine ecosystems but many aquaculture operations remain heavily reliant on fishmeal from wild stocks. How do we balance these competing views and develop thoughtful policies, which result in a larger food supply? Leaders from nonprofit, industry and government discussed the challenges and solutions and our options for the future of fish.
PANELISTS: George Leonard (Ocean Conservancy), Barton Seaver (Chef, author), Dr. Jeremy Jackson (Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation)
Moderator: Ted Morton (SeaWeb)
Organizer: Becky Marshall (SeaWeb)

Watch the Panel (Part 1 and Part 2)

Notes
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4:15-5:30 Plenary: Capitol Hill Ocean Day Training (Grand Ballroom)
Before coming together for one of the largest hill days on the ocean, this plenary gave us the opportunity to talk about why it is important for constituents to visit their members of Congress. Guests heard personal stories from a variety of perspectives on why they choose to educate their members and the impact of their visits. This training gave guests the skills that are needed to ensure a successful visit and the opportunity to meet with their regional groups to go over details and logistics for the Capitol Hill Ocean Day.
Organizer: Blue Frontier Campaign

Watch the Plenary (Here)

Notes Unavailable
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5:45-7:00 PLENARY: Overcoming “Ocean Deficit Disorder”: Reconnecting Our Youth to the Oceans and Nature (Grand Ballroom)
In his book Last Child in the Woods, author Richard Louv introduced us to the term, “nature deficit disorder,” the consequences of a society increasingly disconnected from nature and a phenomenon especially widespread in today’s youth. Lacking regular outdoor experiences, young people today face a nature deficit that is especially challenging when it comes to the oceans, which are more remote and often feared. This panel of environmental educators and youth examined the problem, its societal and policy ramifications, and solutions for how we can reconnect people – starting with our youth – to the oceans.
PANELISTS: Murray Fisher (Urban Assembly New York Harbor School), Dr. Andrea Neal (Blue Ocean Sciences), Rudy Sanchez (2011 Youth Activism Peter Benchley Ocean Award Recipient), Kyle Thiermann (Surf Ambassador, Save the Waves), Cortney Worrall (Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance)
MODERATOR: Dr. David E. Guggenheim (Ocean Doctor)
Organizer: Margo Pellegrino (Activist and paddler)

Watch the Plenary (Part 1 and Part 2)

Notes Unavailable
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7:00 PM SURFING OUR WAY TO THE HILL PARTY
LOCATION: Tonic, 2036 G Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036
The BVS3 experience continued with a Surfrider – DC Chapter sponsored post-panels, pre-Capitol Hill Ocean Day party! Participants met local Surfrider members, networked with other participants and got pumped for a day on the Hill. Immediately following the last plenary on Sunday, participants ventured over to Tonic for some surf movies, drink specials and games.
Organizer: Surfrider – DC Chapter
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